Post Tagged with: "MUSKEGON"

Downtown Dead Crawl aims to promote spending in downtown Muskegon with Halloween-themed event

The inaugural Downtown Dead Crawl will take place from 7 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Nov. 1. The Halloween-themed pub crawl was created “by downtown businesses for downtown businesses” in an effort to increase traffic and spending in downtown Muskegon.

MUSKEGON, MI – Businesses in downtown Muskegon are coming together to host an event that is designed to be entertaining for participants and beneficial for the economy.

Downtown dead crawl.jpgThe inaugural “Downtown Dead Crawl” will take place in downtown Muskegon from 7 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Nov. 1.Courtesy Photo | Unruly Brewing 

The inaugural Downtown Dead Crawl will take place 7 p.m.-2 a.m. on Nov. 1. The Halloween-themed pub crawl was created “by downtown businesses for downtown businesses” in an effort to increase traffic and spending in downtown Muskegon.

“The bigger picture is opening lines of communication downtown,” said Angel Freye, tap room manager at Unruly Brewing Co., the creator of the event. “There’s a lot of existing businesses but also quite a few new ones.

“We all see the potential and direction downtown is going and working together to put on an event to stimulate business encourages the possibility of future events.”

Participating bars include Hennessy’s Pub, Third Street Grill, Tipsy Toad Tavern, Pigeon Hill Brewing Co., Boar’s Belly, Unruly Brewing Co., Mike’s Inn and Smash Wine Bar.

Several other downtown businesses, such as Area 51 Tattoo, Riversedge Photo, Revel Marketing, Muskegon Lumberjacks hockey, Rebel Pies, City Hub Cycle, Just Klassics Deli, Drip Drop Drink, The Cheese Lady and the Holiday Inn Muskegon Harbor are also sponsoring the event.

Instead of the traditional paying of a participation fee, bars donated merchandise and gift cards to participate. Freye said the idea is to encourage people to spend at bars during the pub crawl and to return in order to cash in their gift cards and other merchandise.

“We’re hoping to stir up interest from consumers,” Freye said.

The punch card drawing will take place around 1:30 a.m. at Unruly Brewing. Notable prizes include a package from Unruly Brewing that includes a $50 gift card, a private brew tour and a night’s stay at Holiday Inn Muskegon Harbor, a create-you-own Rebel Pie pizza deal, merchandise from Hot Rod Harley Davidson, gift cards to Area 51 Tattoo and free photo sessions at Riversedge Photo.

The event is open to anyone 21 and older and costumes are “strongly encouraged.” Several downtown bars will have live music and will be independently hosting costume contests, Freye said.

No registration is necessary and guests can pick up punch cards at any participating location. Local cab companies will be on standby throughout the night.

For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page.

Brandon Champion covers arts and entertainment, business and weather for MLive Muskegon Chronicle. Email him at bchampio@mlive.com and follow him on Twitter @BrandonThaChamp.

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Working toward a wedding? Lakeshore Bridal Expo to return to Muskegon Country Club

Prospective brides in the Muskegon area will have a chance to take care of all their wedding needs when the 5th annual Lakeshore Bridal Expo is held at the Muskegon Country Club from 1-4 p.m. on Oct. 19.

MUSKEGON, MI – Few occasions are more of a cause for celebration than a wedding, but before the rehearsals and cake, church bells and saying “I do,” the so-called “big day” takes plenty of planning.

Prospective brides in the Muskegon area will have a chance to take care of all their wedding needs when the 5th annual Lakeshore Bridal Expo is held at the Muskegon Country Club from 1-4 p.m. on Oct. 19.

“It’s just a way to get the ball rolling for brides who are looking to plan their wedding day,” said Lakeshore Bridal Expo Director Nik Tong. “It’s a chance for them to get going early in the game ahead of weddings that may take place in the summer.”

The free event will feature 32 wedding professionals that will be offering their products and assistance. A multitude of wedding-related services, including the expo sponsor Miphotobooth, photographers, catering, bakeries, event center representatives, jewelry, makeup and hairstylists will be on hand.

Several door prizes, including rounds of golf, free dinners and vendor gift certificates will be given away. This year’s grand prize is a $500 travel certificate from Airport Tour and Travel. The first 25 brides to arrive will receive a free gift bag.

Tong said an average of 120 brides and 350 people total have attended the expo over its first four years. Most of the attendees are made up of family of the bride and bridesmaids, but every once in a while grooms will be heading up the wedding plans.

“There’s a handful,” he said. “There are some that are really involved, but a lot of times they just come along to keep the peace, so to speak.”

Brides can also preregister for the show online. For a complete list of vendors or to preregister, visit www.LakeshoreBridalExpo.com.

Brandon Champion covers arts and entertainment, business and weather for MLive Muskegon Chronicle. Email him at bchampio@mlive.com and follow him on Twitter @BrandonThaChamp.

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Filthy fun: Mud, water to be featured at new adventure race at Pere Marquette Park

The Muskegon Rescue Mission is hosting the Foreshore Adventure Race in May of 2015. The unique, 5k-syle event will benefit the mission and will take place on the beach at Pere Marquette Park.

MUSKEGON, MI – An adventure race featuring everything from cargo nets to Pere Marquette beach sand is set to provide Muskegon with a whole new type of spring event.

FORESHORE FINAL LOGO.jpgCourtesy Photo | Muskegon Rescue Mission 

The Muskegon Rescue Mission announced Wednesday its plans for hosting the Foreshore Adventure Race in the spring of 2015. The unique, 5K event will benefit the mission and will take place on the beach at Pere Marquette Park.

It will require participants of all ages to traverse obstacles such as mud pits, cargo nets, tires, and large mounds of sand.

“We’re looking to put on a fun, family event that showcases our beach and our lakefront here in Muskegon,” said Kevin Newton, executive director at the Muskegon Rescue Mission.

“These adventure race events have been extremely popular, but we haven’t had one right here. It’s a fun thing to do to try and get people of all ages and abilities on the waterfront before summer starts. We’re really excited.”

Final details, including the cost to participate in the event, are still being worked out, but the event is set to take place on the morning of May 16, a Saturday. Participants will run through several obstacles almost exclusively on the beach between Pere Marquette Park and Norman F. Kruse Park.

Runners will be able to sign up for different times in order to accommodate serious competitors as well as groups and families looking for a casual, fun experience.

“We are excited to host this unique event,” said Muskegon Mayor Steve Gawron. “Pere Marquette Park is the perfect venue for an adventure run that marries health and wellness with West Michigan’s greatest natural resource. We hope this event soon becomes one of the cornerstones that kick off the beach season at Pere Marquette Park for many years to come.” 

A pre-party is also being planned for the night before. Participants can enjoy each other’s company, eat food and pick up registration items. The event will also include a “Kid’s Zone,” which will feature smaller obstacles that are similar to larger ones on the course.

“If there’s a big set of tires on the main course, there will be a smaller one in the Kid’s Zone,” Newton said. “We want families to be able to talk about their similar experiences. We want this to be a family event.”

Newton is hopeful that thousands of people will attend the event, but added that it’s hard to predict turnout since it’s a new event. He does think it will compare favorably to similar events held in other locations throughout West Michigan.

“This event has the potential to be a cut above some of those other events in terms of using natural resources,” he said. “I think this could be something people are talking about for a while.”

The Muskegon Rescue Mission provides food, shelter, clothing and spiritual direction to those in need. It is 100 percent locally funded. All proceeds from the Foreshore Adventure Race will be used to house and feed people in Muskegon.

Brandon Champion covers arts and entertainment, business and weather for MLive Muskegon Chronicle. Email him at bchampio@mlive.com and follow him on Twitter @BrandonThaChamp.

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Top 5 things to do in Muskegon area this week: Michael Brown discussion, 9/11 exhibit and more

Here are the Top 5 things to do in the Muskegon area for Sept. 22-25, 2014.

1. Diversity Alliance reflects upon Michael Brown in Grand Haven

The shooting death of teenager Michael Brown by Officer Darren Wilson ignited riots and picked at racial wounds in August in Ferguson, Mo., a community in the Greater St. Louis metropolitan area.

These events are the subject of a film and discussion during an event running from 7-9 p.m. on Sept. 23 at the Goodrich Grand Haven 9 Theater, 17220 Hayes St.

The event kicks off with the screening of “Fruitvale Station,” a film based on the story of 22-year-old Oscar Grant III, who was fatally shot by a Bay City Transit police officer on New Year’s Day in 2009. After the film, journalist Clayton Hardiman and Diversity Alliance program director Sarah Salguera will lead a discussion about Brown’s killing and the events surrounding it.

Due to limited seating, registration is required to attend the event. However, admission is free. To register, visit www.fruitvalefilm.eventbrite.com.

2. West Michigan Symphony Exhibition at Muskegon Museum of Art

As part of the 75th anniversary of the West Michigan Symphony, the Muskegon Museum of Art is hosting exhibitions from Sept. 18–Nov. 2 featuring artwork commissioned for the symphony’s business and performance space in the Russell Block Building.

Celebration cards created by West Michigan residents also will be on display.

Admission to the museum is $10 for adults, $5 for college students with valid ID, $5 for MMA members, and $3 for children 13-17 years old. Ages 12 and under are free and auditorium programs are free. Gallery exhibition admission requires purchased ticket.

Admission on second Saturdays of the month is free.

More information is available online at muskegonartmusuem.org.

3. Remember and Rebuild Exhibition at Muskegon Museum of Art

Following its opening to the public on Sept. 11, the Remember and Rebuild exhibition continues through Nov. 9 at the Muskegon Museum of Art.

The exhibition tells the story of the creation of the September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York and reportedly is the first exhibition to feature the work of 9/11 staff photographer Amy Dreher. In addition, artifacts are on display from the collections at the September 11 Memorial and Museum.

For more information, visit muskegonartmuseum.org.

4. Muskegon County Water Festival at USS Silversides Museum

Nearly 1,200 Muskegon-area students are expected to attend the second annual Muskegon County Water Festival from 9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. and noon-2 p.m. on Sept. 23-24 at the USS Silversides Submarine Museum in Muskegon.

According to a release, the event was so popular a year ago, a wait list was created to open opportunities for more students. The event also was extended from one day to a two-day festival.

The event is scheduled as a jumpstart to the third grade curriculum and schools from Muskegon Reeths-Puffer, Orchard View, Oakridge, Mona Shores, Fruitport and Muskegon, among others, are scheduled to attend.

The Muskegon County Water Festival is presented free to the students through a donation by the DTE Energy Foundation.

5. Grand Haven Art Walk in Grand Haven

A collaboration of artists, museums and community members, the Grand Haven ArtWalk runs Sept. 24–Oct. 12 throughout downtown Grand Haven.

The opening gala and closing ceremonies along with an Oct. 9 party are scheduled to be held at The Tri-Cities Historical Museum. Many downtown Grand Haven businesses also have been encouraged to participate as a means to support ArtWalk, and more than 50 are listed as participants in the event.

There’s a $25 registration fee for each piece of art entered.

For more information, visit Grand Haven ArtWalk online at ghartwalk.com.

Dillon Davis is a staff writer at MLive Muskegon Chronicle. Email him at ddavis11@mlive.com and follow him on Facebook and on Twitter.

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Life, death and an Irish jig: Michigan Irish Music Festival delights crowds on final day

How do you make death a joyous affair? Ask Steve and Cathy Jo Smith, experts on the rituals of an Irish wake.

MUSKEGON, MI – How do you make death a joyous affair? Ask Steve and Cathy Jo Smith, experts on the rituals of an Irish wake.

There is no mourning in the house. Clocks are stopped and mirrors are covered as a sign of respect, and to keep spirits and fairies away. And through a three-day period of not leaving the body unattended, community members gather to drink whiskey, eat a lavish feast and smoke using pipes and tobacco as part of the process.

If it’s anything like the Smith’s model tent, it’s truly a sight to be seen.

CelticKilroy.jpgPerformer Celtic Kilroy shares a moment with Norton Shores residents Agnes Rose, 98, and Fred McWain on Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014 at Heritage Landing during the final day of the Michigan Irish Music Festival.Dillon Davis | ddavis11@mlive.com 

There are many cultural lessons attached to this process, ones the Smiths, of Grove City, Ohio, felt would be a fitting addition to four days of the 15th annual Michigan Irish Music Festival, held at Heritage Landing in downtown Muskegon.

Steve Smith stressed that the handling of death is an important part of Irish culture, which has kept he and his wife traveling to share this lesson for more than 14 years.

“People don’t understand why they would turn this into a party,” Smith said. “You know, the short answer is, England occupied Ireland for almost 800 years and the Irish were held down. … It was illegal for too many Irishmen to gather together at one place at one time with two exceptions: weddings and wakes.

“If you’re marrying or burying someone, you want to take advantage of the time.”

Apart from lessons of death, the Michigan Irish Music Festival was abound with life Sunday afternoon, complete with the strumming of strings, the stirring of kettle corn and a few steps here and there to an Irish jig.

Chris Zahrt, president of the Michigan Irish Music Festival, said the festival continues to grow each year, seen prevalently in the expansion of music and food options.

Although the weather is an area festival organizers can’t control, Zahrt said the festival has carved its place on the annual event calendar in the Muskegon area – a long way from where it started under a single tent 15 years ago.

“(The festival is) to present the Irish culture and we do that through music and food and dance and the cultural presentation,” Zahrt said. “We’re so unique because there’s not really another event like this in Michigan where you can hear this type of music or eat this type of food or you know, listen to people present different cultural topics.”

The food options, in particular, stand out about the festival with options ranging from traditional Irish dishes to carnival food such as elephant ears and deep fried Twinkies. There also were multiple vendors offering beer and liquor drinks, some options seemingly written out of a James Joyce novel.

One of the food eateries on hand was McGovern Catering of Shelby. The McGovern family has been with the Michigan Irish Music Festival since the beginning and offered patrons a taste of classical Irish fare, complete with breads and potatoes and meats.

Michael McGovern, son of McGovern Catering owner Mike McGovern, commented about the growing crowds during the festival and how, despite the growth, festival organizers have kept pace with them.

“The festival gets more organized every year, everybody gets more organized and they’re more efficient,” he said. “There are huge crowds here but you wouldn’t know it. I think everybody has learned to be more efficient and helping to make the experience positive for everybody, keeping it moving.”

Muskegon native and Allendale resident Brandon Cilla made his second consecutive trip to the festival this year.

Cilla, who was not aware of how long the festival had been going in the area, said the music continues to be a draw for him.

“I came down last year and I enjoyed it very much,” Cilla said. “I decided to come again, this time for the entire three days and I’ve enjoyed it thoroughly.”

Dillon Davis is a staff writer at MLive Muskegon Chronicle. Email him at ddavis11@mlive.com and follow him on Facebook and on Twitter

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Life, death and an Irish jig: Michigan Irish Music Festival delights crowds on final day

How do you make death a joyous affair? Ask Steve and Cathy Jo Smith, experts on the rituals of an Irish wake.

MUSKEGON, MI – How do you make death a joyous affair? Ask Steve and Cathy Jo Smith, experts on the rituals of an Irish wake.

There is no mourning in the house. Clocks are stopped and mirrors are covered as a sign of respect, and to keep spirits and fairies away. And through a three-day period of not leaving the body unattended, community members gather to drink whiskey, eat a lavish feast and smoke using pipes and tobacco as part of the process.

If it’s anything like the Smith’s model tent, it’s truly a sight to be seen.

CelticKilroy.jpgPerformer Celtic Kilroy shares a moment with Norton Shores residents Agnes Rose, 98, and Fred McWain on Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014 at Heritage Landing during the final day of the Michigan Irish Music Festival.Dillon Davis | ddavis11@mlive.com 

There are many cultural lessons attached to this process, ones the Smiths, of Grove City, Ohio, felt would be a fitting addition to four days of the 15th annual Michigan Irish Music Festival, held at Heritage Landing in downtown Muskegon.

Steve Smith stressed that the handling of death is an important part of Irish culture, which has kept he and his wife traveling to share this lesson for more than 14 years.

“People don’t understand why they would turn this into a party,” Smith said. “You know, the short answer is, England occupied Ireland for almost 800 years and the Irish were held down. … It was illegal for too many Irishmen to gather together at one place at one time with two exceptions: weddings and wakes.

“If you’re marrying or burying someone, you want to take advantage of the time.”

Apart from lessons of death, the Michigan Irish Music Festival was abound with life Sunday afternoon, complete with the strumming of strings, the stirring of kettle corn and a few steps here and there to an Irish jig.

Chris Zahrt, president of the Michigan Irish Music Festival, said the festival continues to grow each year, seen prevalently in the expansion of music and food options.

Although the weather is an area festival organizers can’t control, Zahrt said the festival has carved its place on the annual event calendar in the Muskegon area – a long way from where it started under a single tent 15 years ago.

“(The festival is) to present the Irish culture and we do that through music and food and dance and the cultural presentation,” Zahrt said. “We’re so unique because there’s not really another event like this in Michigan where you can hear this type of music or eat this type of food or you know, listen to people present different cultural topics.”

The food options, in particular, stand out about the festival with options ranging from traditional Irish dishes to carnival food such as elephant ears and deep fried Twinkies. There also were multiple vendors offering beer and liquor drinks, some options seemingly written out of a James Joyce novel.

One of the food eateries on hand was McGovern Catering of Shelby. The McGovern family has been with the Michigan Irish Music Festival since the beginning and offered patrons a taste of classical Irish fare, complete with breads and potatoes and meats.

Michael McGovern, son of McGovern Catering owner Mike McGovern, commented about the growing crowds during the festival and how, despite the growth, festival organizers have kept pace with them.

“The festival gets more organized every year, everybody gets more organized and they’re more efficient,” he said. “There are huge crowds here but you wouldn’t know it. I think everybody has learned to be more efficient and helping to make the experience positive for everybody, keeping it moving.”

Muskegon native and Allendale resident Brandon Cilla made his second consecutive trip to the festival this year.

Cilla, who was not aware of how long the festival had been going in the area, said the music continues to be a draw for him.

“I came down last year and I enjoyed it very much,” Cilla said. “I decided to come again, this time for the entire three days and I’ve enjoyed it thoroughly.”

Dillon Davis is a staff writer at MLive Muskegon Chronicle. Email him at ddavis11@mlive.com and follow him on Facebook and on Twitter

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Community lecture series explores depths of Civil War at USS Silversides Museum

Following a successful partnership to bring a World War II lecture series to the area earlier this year, the USS Silversides Museum and Muskegon Community College once again are teaming up for the “Civil War and Gettysburg” lecture series.

MUSKEGON, MI – Following a successful partnership to bring a World War II lecture series to the area earlier this year, the USS Silversides Submarine Museum and Muskegon Community College once again are teaming up for the “Civil War and Gettysburg” lecture series.

The lectures start Sept. 15 and run weekly through Oct. 6 at the Silversides, 1346 Bluff St., in Muskegon.

Once the lectures are completed, interested parties can attend a three-day trip to Gettysburg, Pa., which includes visits to the site of one of the Civil War’s most memorable battles.

Professors Kurt Troutman and George Maniates are scheduled to lead the lecture series, providing an in-depth look at the Civil War and the events leading up to it.

For Peggy Maniates, curator of the USS Silversides Submarine Museum, the series provides the community an opportunity to learn about a paramount moment in American history, and do so in an environment conducive for learning.

“There’s a great deal of interest in adults who want to learn beyond the classroom,” Peggy Maniates said. “This gives them the opportunity to take the classes you wanted to take but couldn’t take. A lot of people are excited because they look for something educational and this provides them that opportunity.”

Lectures are $5 per person and admission is included with a USS Silversides Submarine Museum membership or the Gettysburg Travel Package. All lectures begin at 6 p.m. MCC students can take the course for credit.

Here’s the full lecture schedule along with travel information:

Sept 15: Drumbeats of War – A Missouri Compromise, Bleeding Kansas and John Brown’s Raid.

Sept. 22: First Cut is the Deepest – Lincoln’s gamble at Fort Sumter plunges the country into war.

Sept. 29: The Advance of Freedom – Union Success at Gettysburg

Oct. 6: A Seminal Moment – Hallowed Ground and the Restoration of the Union.

Oct. 17–20: Gettysburg trip. $450 for the bus trip, three nights in the hotel, three breakfasts, all Museum and National Battlefield tickets and the four lectures.

For more information, visit the Silversides online at silversidesmusuem.org or check out Muskegon Community College at muskegoncc.edu/Gettysburg.

Dillon Davis is a staff writer at MLive Muskegon Chronicle. Email him at ddavis11@mlive.com and follow him on Facebook and on Twitter

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Remember and Rebuild: Things to know about new 9/11 exhibition at Muskegon Museum of Art

Everyone remembers exactly where they were; everyone can recall exactly how it made them feel.

MUSKEGON, MI — Everyone remembers exactly where they were; everyone can recall exactly how it made them feel.

The Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center buildings in New York City, the Pentagon in Washington D.C., and Shanksville, Pa., caused the deaths of more than 3,000 people and forever changed the fabric of American society.

Now 13 years after the attacks, the Muskegon Museum of Art is opening an exhibition called “Remember and Rebuild” to tell the story of the creation of the September 11 Memorial and Museum, which started construction in 2006. The exhibit is open to the public from Sept. 11–Nov. 9 with different events scheduled through the duration of its stay at the museum.

The idea behind the exhibition is to pay tribute to those lost on Sept. 11, strengthen a sense of national identity and “express unity, respect and inspiration” that people feel when visiting the museum.

The exhibition kicks off on Sept. 11, 2014 with the Remember and Rebuild Opening Event, an outdoor ceremony open to the public, to honor those who perished on Sept. 11, 2001. Muskegon firefighters who reportedly traveled to Ground Zero, elected officials, as well as local union and trade representatives will be in attendance.

Admission to the museum is $10 for adults, $5 for college students with valid ID, $5 for MMA members, and $ 3 for children 13-17 years old. Ages 12 and under are free and auditorium programs are free. Gallery exhibition admission requires purchased ticket.

Admission on second Saturdays of the month is free.

Here are some things to know about the opening at the Muskegon Museum of Art:

What will you see?

Remember and Rebuild reportedly is the first exhibition to feature the work of 9/11 staff photographer Amy Dreher, as well as the first to introduce a series of artifacts from the collections at the September 11 Memorial and Museum.

The exhibition was organized by the Muskegon Museum of Art in collaboration with the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York City.

Key supporters include Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, the National Endowment for the Arts, Richard and Nancy Morgenstern, Port City Group, Ramos and Sons Auto Body and Towing, the Rotary Club of Spring Lake, Port City Group, Roger and Marilyn Andersen and the MMA NYC Tour Group and MLive Muskegon Chronicle.

Be part of Muskegon’s video tribute

Beyond the opening event, the exhibition is providing an opportunity for the community to be involved through Community Sharing and Video Taping.

The Muskegon Museum of Art Partnered with Baker College of Muskegon’s second-year Digital Video Production students to capture the Sept. 11 stories of visitors to the exhibition, with the goal being to create Muskegon’s video memorial of Sept. 11, 2001.

Tapings will run from 1-3 p.m. on Sept. 18, Oct. 2, Oct. 16 and Oct. 30 with an additional taping session from 5-7 p.m. on Oct. 2 and Oct. 30.  

A copy of the project will be presented as a gift to the National September 11 Memorial and Museum.

Supporting Their Own: Stories from Muskegon Firefighters at Ground Zero

One of the major stories to come out of Sept. 11, 2001 was the overwhelming bravery of police and firefighters who rushed to the sites at the World Trade Center buildings, the Pentagon and Shanksville, Pa., to help others.

The nine Muskegon firefighters who visited the site of 9/11 following the attacks are hosting a panel discussion Oct. 23 to share the stories of their fallen comrades along with the lessons they took away from the visit.

The event starts at 6:30 p.m. with the panel discussion beginning at 7 p.m.

Brown Bag Films and Super Saturdays

The Muskegon Museum of Art is hosting a series of events to commemorate the stay of the exhibition.

Starting Sept. 11 and running on select dates through Oct. 11, the Muskegon Museum of Art is bringing a movie series of 9/11-based films as well as accompanying activities, which all are free and open to the public.

A full list of events is available at muskegonartmuseum.org.

Did you know?

Sept. 11, 2001 marked the single-largest loss of life from a foreign attack on American soil in history, ahead of only the Pearl Harbor attacks in 1941.  

Of the nearly 3,000 people killed on 9/11, at least 400 were police officers and firefighters, many of whom risked their lives to protect others in the aftermath of the attacks.

The National September 11 Memorial and Museum opened up to the public on the site of the Sept. 11 attacks on Sept 12, 2011 with the museum opening to the public on May 21, 2014. According to the museum’s website, the museum includes 23,000 images, 10,300 artifacts and the oral histories of nearly 2,000 people provided by friends and family members of 9/11 victims.

The museum was designed by Davis Brody Bond, LLP.

Dillon Davis is a staff writer at MLive Muskegon Chronicle. Email him at ddavis11@mlive.com and follow him on Facebook and on Twitter.

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